ABOUT US

Shreyas Dental is a multi-speciality dental hospital conceptualized by Dr. Kiran Patel, an Internationally Trained Cortico-Basal Implant Surgeon and a Pioneer in Basal Implantology in Gujarat, India. Shreyas is an ISO 9000: 2015 certified dental hospital and is equipped with the most advanced dental technology. It is a state-of-the-art hospital located just 30 minutes away from the International Airport.

WHAT IS THE COST FOR DENTAL implant TREATMENT IN INDIA?

The costs would definitely surprise you! Not compromising even minutely on the quality, the cost for dental implant treatment at Shreyas Dental Hospital is 70% lesser compared to costs in the U.S.  Europe, Australia or Middle East.

Shreyas Dental Hospital is one of the few dental implant centers in the world, accredited and recognized by the International Implant Foundation based in Munich, Germany. Dr. Kiran Patel, is a Clinical Master of Immediate Functional Loading Implantology and has been trained under the mentorship of the world renowned implantologist, Dr. Stefan Ihde

THINGS TO DO IN AHMEDABAD

Sabarmati Ashram

About the location: Inaugurated by his contemporary Jawaharlal Nehru, Mahatma Gandhi’s erstwhile home has been converted to a simple but engaging museum. The Ashram, named after the eponym Sabarmati River is fragmented into two sections – where Gandhi actually lived, and the modern section conceived by architect Charles Correa. The ashram is ensconced in a peaceful aura, partially due to the reverence that visitors show and possibly due to a unique energy that the place actually has. This is the place where Gandhi started the Satyagraha Movement. You will find that the complex dotted with people meditating, walking in silence or transfixed to the gallery, which showcases Gandhi’s many photographs and memorabilia. The finest part for a traveller is to pick a spinning wheel memento from the curio shop and also send a postcard from the in-house postbox. A special ‘charkha’ stamp is used when your mail leaves the ashram.

About the location: Inaugurated by his contemporary Jawaharlal Nehru, Mahatma Gandhi’s erstwhile home has been converted to a simple but engaging museum. The Ashram, named after the eponym Sabarmati River is fragmented into two sections – where Gandhi actually lived, and the modern section conceived by architect Charles Correa. The ashram is ensconced in a peaceful aura, partially due to the reverence that visitors show and possibly due to a unique energy that the place actually has. This is the place where Gandhi started the Satyagraha Movement. You will find that the complex dotted with people meditating, walking in silence or transfixed to the gallery, which showcases Gandhi’s many photographs and memorabilia. The finest part for a traveller is to pick a spinning wheel memento from the curio shop and also send a postcard from the in-house postbox. A special ‘charkha’ stamp is used when your mail leaves the ashram.

Brief History: The original ashram was established in May 1915 at the Kocharab Bungalow of Jivanlal Desai (about 10km from here), who was a barrister friend of Gandhi. It was given the name of Satyagraha Ashram. Mahatma Gandhi wanted to carry out activities like farming and animal husbandry and needed more space. In 17 June 1917, the ashram was relocated to an area of thirty-six acres on the banks of the river Sabarmati.

Visiting Hours: 8AM–6.30PM

Lalbhai Dalpatbhai Museum

About the location: Part of the LD Institute of Indology, this museum houses a fine collection of ancient and medieval Indian art treasures, including stone, marble, bronze and woodcarvings and 75,000 Jain manuscripts in over nine galleries dedicated to a specific variety of art or historical heritage. The 6th-century AD sandstone carving from Madhya Pradesh, the oldest-known carved image of the god Rama, is also part of the collection amidst ancient coins, bronze and stone statues and artwork. Amongst other noteworthy pieces, the Chola style Nataraja (11th century AD) and an exuberant Nepali/ Tibetan bronze Mandala (18th century AD) are prominent exhibits in the gallery.

Brief History: Shri Kasturbhai Lalbhai, a well-known Ahmedabad based industrialist, and Jain Acharya Muni Punyavijayji jointly established the museum in 1956 as the Lalbhai Dalpatbhai Institute of Indology. Muni Punyavijayji donated his personal collection of manuscripts, bronzes and paintings. The collection grew more extensive over the years and the vast repository of heritage needed more space to showcase. In 1984, a new building adjacent to the LD Institute of Indology was built by world acclaimed architect, Balakrishna Doshi. The LD Museum was formally inaugurated by Brajkumar Nehru, the then Governor of Gujarat.

Visiting Hours: 10.30am–5pm (Monday closed)

Heritage Walk- Ahmedabad

On the ancient site of Ashaval and Karnavati, Ahmedabad was found on 1411. The City of Ahmedabad has some of the finest India, Islamic monuments and exquisite Hindu and Jain temples. Its carved wooden houses are another unique architectural tradition.

A special feature of Ahmedabad is the plan of the old city comprising numerous pols, self-contained neighborhoods, sheltering large numbers of peoples. Some of these virtually small villages, traversed by narrow streets, usually terminating in square with community wells and chabutaras for feeding birds, gates, Cul-de-sacs and secret passages. To experience the glory of Ahmedabad, it is necessary to walk through an old quarter and truly observe the nature of its architecture, its art, religious places, its culture and traditions. 

With the purpose of unveiling the city to the tourists and the citizens themselves, Ahmedabad Municipal Corporation has arranged this HERITAGE WALK OF AHMEDABAD.

Hutheesing Jain Temple

About The Place: This remarkably elegant temple created out of white marble has been sacred to many Jain families, generation after generation. It was built in 1848 A.D. at an estimated cost of 10 lakh rupees by a rich merchant Sheth Hutheesing as a dedication to the 15th Jain Tirthankara, Shri Dharmanatha. Traditional artisans working in stone belonged to the Sonpura & Salat communities. The Salat community constructed masterpieces of architecture ranging from forts, palaces to temples. The work of the Hutheesing Jain temple is attributed to Premchand Salat. One scholar has remarked, “Each part goes on increasing in dignity as we approach the sanctuary. Whether looked at from its courts or from the outside, it possesses variety without confusion and appropriateness of every part to the purpose for which it was intended.”

Located outside the Delhi Gate, the temple is spread over a sprawling courtyard, a mandapa surmounted by a large ridged dome, which is supported by 12 ornate pillars. The small garbhagruh (main shrine) on the east end reaches up into three stunningly carved spires and encircled by 52 small shrines dedicated to the various Tirthankars. There are large protruding porches with magnificently decorated columns and figural brackets on three outer sides. Also, a recently built 78 ft Mahavir stambha (tower) fashioned after the renowned tower at Chittor in Rajasthan, flanks the outer courtyard by the front entrance. Some of the motifs used in the design remind one of the Sultanate minarets of the Mughal period.

Heritage Walk- Ahmedabad

About the location: A resurrection of the cityscape and the river Sabarmati in 2005 led to the making of the Sabarmati Riverfront, a 22km planned promenade of which only a part is now complete. Boating stations and pop-up exhibition spaces are built along the river, but it is the fitness enthusiasts who do due justice to the path on daily walks and jogs. Eleven bridges built over the Sabarmati River connect the old and new parts of the city. Of these, the Ellis Bridge is the oldest – built in 1873. It was a wooden structure that was destroyed by a flood but re-constructed for use. Other bridges include Gandhi Bridge, Nehru Bridge, Subhash Bridge, Vadaj – Dudheshwar Bridge, Sardar Bridge, Chandrabhaga Bridge, Ambedkar Bridge (Vasna Pirana Bridge), Lal Bahadur Shastri Bridge, Fernandes Bridge and the Dandi Bridge.
Flower garden has been envisioned as a permanent flower garden spread in Approx 45000 Sqmt where more than 330 native and exotic flower species. Throughout the year, the garden serves as a city level unique park where visitors can enjoy beautiful flowers of both seasonal and non-seasonal varieties. It strengthens the green space network on the western part of the city. 
Brief History: The Sabarmati River has been the lifeline of the city of Ahmedabad for centuries. The river was given a prominence when the city went through an urban overhaul in 2005. The riverfront was made an integral part and opened for the public to enjoy a corniche-like walkway.
Visiting Hours: Sunrise to Sunset

Hutheesing Jain Temple

About the location: About 80km southwest of Ahmedabad, the city that stood at this archaeological site 4500 years ago was one of the most important of the Indus Valley civilisation, which extended into what is now Pakistan. Excavations have revealed the world’s oldest known artificial dock, which was connected to an old course of the Sabarmati River. Other features include the acropolis, the lower town, the bead factory, the warehouses, and the drainage system. The site has been nominated to be enlisted as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The traveller can see fascinating finds by archeologists like canals and dockyards that explain how this was an important trading city. Artefacts suggest that trade may have been conducted with Mesopotamia, Egypt and Persia. An entire township with market and dock has been unearthed here. An Archaeological Museum (10am–5pm, Friday closed) near the site houses a number of artefacts like jewellery, pottery, seals, religious symbols, and objects of daily use here.

Brief History: It is said that Lothal is a combination of two words; Loth and thal, which in Gujarati means ‘the mound of the dead.’ The city was inhabited during 3700 BCE and was a thriving trading port. The excavation started from 13 February 1955 to 19 May 1960 by the Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) to unearth the ancient city. Archaeologists believe that the city was a part of a major river system on the ancient trade route from Sindh to Saurashtra in Gujarat. Excavations here have offered the greatest number of antiquities in the archaeology of modern India.

Kankaria Lake

About the location: Built in 1451 as Hauz e Qutub, and recently converted as a recreation space for the city, this large lake is a good respite from the hectic streets. In fact, this is the second largest lake of Ahmedabad, offering a pleasing visual break from the buildings and roads. Attractions include a tethered hot-air balloon (10min ride Rs 100; 10am–10pm), a mini-train and the Kamla Nehru Zoo (entry/camera Rs 20/5; Mar–Oct 9am–6.15pm and Nov–Feb 9am–5.30pm). One Tree Hill Garden on the west side (entered from outside) contains some quite grand colonial Dutch tombs. There are additional trappings of a public entertainment space that can keep kids hooked for hours.

Brief History: The origin of Kankaria Lake goes back to Chalukyan times. According to the 14th century chronicler Merutunga, the Chalukya ruler Karna built a temple dedicated to the goddess Kochharba. He also established the Karnavati city close to Ahmedabad, where he commissioned the Karnamukteshwara and Jayantidevi temples. The king also built the Karnasagara tank at Karnavati next to Karneshvara Temple. They say Karnasagar tank is today’s Kankaria Lake. Though the construction was started by lake started by Sultan Muizz-ud-Din Muhammad Shah II, it was completed in 1451 in Ahmedabad’s architectural golden period by Sultan Qutb-ud-Din Ahmad Shah II. Researchers say that the name Hauj-e-Qutb (the tank of Qutb) after the Sultan Qutb-ud-Din was the original name of the lake.

Historians believe that the lake gets its name from the large quantities of limestone (kankar in Gujarati) that was dug out of it during excavation. Another story narrates that the Sultan Qutb-ud-Din asked Saint Shah Alam to select the site for a tank and a garden in his kingdom. The saint scattered some pebbles on the site, which was later excavated and the lake was built on the exact spot. A different story leans towards the saint Hazrat-i-Shah Alam’s saga, in which he cut his foot on a sharp pebble while passing through excavation. The lake was then called Kankaria or full of pebbles.

Nalsarovar Bird Sanctuary

About the location: This 121-sq-km sanctuary, 60km southwest of Ahmedabad, protects Nalsarovar Lake, iron-flat plains and wetlands. This is the largest wetland sanctuary in the state and one of the biggest in the country as well. The sanctuary has flocks of indigenous and migratory birds, with as many as 250 species passing through in the winters. Ducks, geese, eagles, spoonbills, cranes, pelicans and flamingos are best seen at daybreak and dusk. Wild asses and black bucks are also commonly seen in the lush region. There is an interpretation centre here which offers details on birds and the habitat, especially flamingos, pelicans, egrets, herons, ducks, cormorants and cranes. Nalsarovar is a proposed Ramsar Convention site, which is a list of wetlands of international importance.

Brief History: The region was declared a sanctuary in 1969, and a Ramsar site since 2012.

Information Source: gujarattourism.com
Lalbhai Dalpatbhai Museum Image Source: Ahmedabadtourism.in